Stage I-IIIA - Invasive

About the Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score Test

If you’ve been recently diagnosed with early stage, estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), HER2-negative (HER2-) breast cancer, the Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score test can help you and your doctor understand what treatment options are right for you—including whether you’re likely to benefit from chemotherapy.1,2

The Breast Recurrence Score test looks at several cancer-related genes in your tumor tissue. Because every woman’s tumor is unique, understanding the biology of your specific tumor will help you and your doctor make more confident decisions about your care. Find out if you’re eligible for the test.

How the test works

The Breast Recurrence Score test is a genomic test—it looks at the activity of tumor genes. Specifically, the test measures the activity of a group of cancer-related genes in your tumor tissue. The activity of these genes can provide information about how your tumor might behave in the future, including how likely it is to grow and spread or whether it is likely to respond to chemotherapy (in addition to hormonal therapy).

After the test, you’ll get a score between 0-100. A low score means the cancer has a lower chance of returning and you have a lower chance of benefiting from chemotherapy. A high score means the cancer has a higher chance of returning and you have a higher chance of benefiting from chemotherapy. Learn more about the test results.

To date, the Breast Recurrence Score test has been ordered in over 500,000 patients.3 Many women who received high Recurrence Score results were able to choose chemotherapy as a potentially life-saving treatment. The majority of women with low Recurrence Score results were able to effectively pursue hormonal therapy alone and avoid the unnecessary side effects of chemotherapy.4-11

Getting the test: No additional procedures are necessary

Getting the test is easy. Tumor tissue for the test can be taken from a procedure such as a biopsy or surgery (lumpectomy). You will NOT need any additional surgery or procedure to get the Breast Recurrence Score test.

Here’s how the test works:

STEP 1 of 6

You have surgery to remove your tumor.

STEP 2 of 6

Your doctor orders the Breast Recurrence Score test.

STEP 3 of 6

The hospital sends a sample of your tumor tissue to the Genomic Health laboratory.

STEP 4 of 6

The Genomic Health laboratory examines the genes in your tumor.

STEP 5 of 6

Your doctor receives the results (approximately two weeks after Genomic Health receives your tissue).

STEP 6 of 6

You and your doctor review the results and make decisions about your treatment.

Reasons to get the Breast Recurrence Score test

There are several compelling reasons to get the test:

  • It provides insight into your tumor biology that is not available from traditional measures. Without the Breast Recurrence Score test, doctors can only estimate how likely a patient’s cancer is to return by looking at factors such as age, tumor size, tumor grade, and lymph node status. The Breast Recurrence Score test provides individualized information about your tumor that’s not available from these clinical and pathologic features.
  • It’s the only test proven to predict chemotherapy benefit. Several studies have consistently proven that only the Breast Recurrence Score test can predict whether you will benefit from chemotherapy.1,2 Therefore, the Breast Recurrence Score test can help you and your physician tailor a treatment plan specifically for you.
  • It’s included in all major breast cancer treatment guidelines. Organizations include the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN®), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO®), the St. Gallen Consensus panel, the National Institute for Health Care Excellence (NICE), and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).12-16

Get more information

REFERENCES

1. Paik et al. N Engl J Med. 2006.
2. Albain et al. Lancet Oncol. 2010.
3. Data on file. Genomic Health Inc.
4. Sparano et al. N Engl J Med. 2015.
5. Gluz et al. J Clin Oncol. 2016.
6. Stemmer et al. SABCS 2015.
7. Petkov et al. npj Breast Cancer. 2016.
8. Shak et al. ASCO QCS 2016.
9. Stemmer et al. ESMO 2016.
10. Roberts et al. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017
11. Shak et al. ESMO 2016.
12. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. V.2.2017.
13. Harris et al. J Clin Oncol. 2016.
14. Coates et al. Ann Oncol. 2015.
15. NICE Diagnostics Guidance 10. 2013.
16. Senkus et al. Ann Oncol. 2015.

 

American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and ASCO are registered trademarks of ASCO; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and NCCN are registered trademarks of NCCN. ASCO and NCCN do not endorse any product or therapy.

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